Monday, November 21, 2016

#giftalong2016 - My To-Knit List

In just about 24 hours, the big Indie Design Gift-A-Long sale starts on Ravelry. I don't know if you have to be a member of Ravelry to take advantage of the sale -- 25% off (using coupon code giftalong2016) of 5,106 patterns by 335 designers from 33 countries! It's so inspiring to see how creative crafty people can be.

I started making my list of projects that I want to make -- mostly hats and small quick things. I find that they are the perfect type of thing to clear my knitter's brain between big projects or when my creativity starts to fail.

Just seeing how other designers create and combine and innovate helps fire the synapses in my brain.

So I've put together a list of five designs that I would like to tackle during the GAL/KAL while I'm also working on some of my other designs. I'd love to know what you're excited to make, too.

No Place Like Home - a pair of slippers by Carolyn Macpherson. I met Carolyn during last year's GAL. Or maybe the year before? I don't remember now. She's so very creative and inspiring and enthusiastic. Carolyn also has a YouTube channel and I love to listen to her chatter on about yarn and projects and such while I'm knitting. These slippers look just right to gift to my mom and my aunts, something quick and small and, if a gift is needed quickly, just right to have in my arsenal.
Trondra - a fair isle hat by Emily K Williams. I love the construction of this hat and the way the colors fade and ombre together into each other. Plus, I'm really dying to know how Emily created the "swirl" at the top of the hat. I don't really like hats that fit tight to my head because I they make me look like I've got a pinhead. Plus, all the possible color combinations? Two-color fair isle patterns are so classy!
Flaming Beanie - a two-color brioche cable hat pattern by Lady in Yarn. I've been avoiding two-color brioche, mainly because I don't really like being "trendy" and it was so popular last year. I have to get over that and embrace the popular. Sometimes. And I love cables, especially in a hat. In-the-round is the best way to work cables, in my opinion, because it's easier to "read" the stitches and work the pattern. I'm curious to find out if that holds true with brioche stitches.
Soviet Hat - a cable hat by Solène Le Roux. Again - cables. I love cables. The pattern description says there are instructions for making the brim longer and I'll definitely do that. I like to fold my ribbing up and make it double thick. And a pompom on top! Sign me up. You oughtta know by now that I love a good pompom on top of my hats.
Beeswax Hat - a cabled/textured hat by Amy van de Laar. I don't know if it's the cables, the texture or the honeycomb texture I like most about this hat but I'm in. I adore a DK weight yarn in hat knitting. It's warm enough for most cool days but not so heavy that you'll die if you go indoors or get in the car. It's such an interesting texture, too. Combining knits, purls and cables is one of my favorite things right now.

As I was looking through these patterns again, I noticed that every one of these designers comes from a country I'd love to visit, too -- Canada, Scotland, Sweden, France and Australia! It's like my own mini world trip without having to get off my couch. Too bad, though, I'd love to go yarn shopping in each one of those countries.

I really need to win the lottery!

So tell me - what patterns/projects are you excited about?

And don't forget to check out the patterns available in the GAL sale that starts November 22, 2016. All of the participating designers are listed in the GAL forum here (I'm number 238.) Come say hi!

A few of the patterns I have offered in the GAL sale. Use coupon code giftalong2016 from
November 22, 2016 at 8:00 pm US EST to November 30th at 11:59pm US EST on these and
thousands of others!

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Winter is Coming. Will You Be Ready?

It's that time of year, folks. The northern hemisphere braces for cold weather and winter holidays and pumpkin spice everything; while the southern hemisphere rolls their eyes at northern-centricities. (I'm making all that up but you can bet, if I lived in the southern hemisphere, I'd be irritated that just as my weather starts to get hotter, most things turn to winter. Or at least that's how I imagine it would be. I've never actually been to the southern hemisphere. This is all pure fiction. Don't hate me.)

But knitters, in general, don't really care about the season. Most knitting takes too long to knit "in season." If you're anything like me, you're probably knitting three or four season changes ahead. I just started a sweater that I'm sure won't be ready until next winter season. But I started now. Because. I don't need a reason.

In my part of the country, winter is slow in coming. It's almost 70 degrees today! Middle of November! I'm really ready for scarves and hats but it's still too danged hot. But I know it will happen and I know my friends and family will start looking at my hats and mittens and scarves and cowls with that "uh, where's mine?" look. You know it. It's all puppy dog eyes and "oh, that's so pretty, it looks so warm" and "Hey! Give me that!"

Some people are very pushy. It's the nature of cold weather and wool.

Fortunately for me, this is also the time of year for the Indie Design Gift-Along on Ravelry, which kicks off on November 22, 2016 with a nine-day 25% off sale offered by indie designers on selected patterns. There are games and contests and drawings and all kinds of fun all the way through December 31, 2016.

I love this time of year because hundreds (literally multiple hundreds) of talented and creative indie designers get together to promote the best of their designs and, more impressively to me, their fellow designers and creators and to celebrate each other's abilities. It feels very "we love everyone" and that just makes me happy.

I'll be looking for new hat patterns mostly. Hats are nice and quick and portable and I personally can never have too many hats. Over the next few days, as the list of designers is released and I start looking through everything offered, I'll show off the hat patterns I like and why I like them.

So what kind of things do you like to knit as gifts, something quick and easy?

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Back to School: Knit a Hat

About this time of year I always get nostalgic for the good ol' days. The days of new clothes, new paper and pencils, new crayons, new teachers. Back to school. Okay, I get it, it's November, but c'mon, with climate change and everything it's still 80 degrees in eastern USA and that's summer weather in my book.

I loved the promise of learning new things. That promise wasn't often broken, but let's not get bogged down in the public school system of the USA. Blah.

I still get excited by learning new things. It's the constant expanding of my mind, making the mental connections between A and B, that I find so intriguing. YouTube is an amazing resource for someone like me that wants to constantly find new hobbies or new ideas. If I can make a suggestion for a YouTube channel that's really exciting to me right now, I'd suggest Corning Museum of Glass because they have all these long demonstrations of people working with hot molten glass and it's fascinating and perfect for marathon knitting sessions.

When I first started designing patterns, they were simple scarf patterns. And I'm sure they were terrible and full of errors. I had never even heard of the concept of a tech editor back then. Frankly, it was even before Ravelry, so I'm sure I didn't even know there were people that were designing patterns independently. I just knew that I was teaching a scarf-of-the-month class and needed patterns. I wanted patterns that actually taught something--lace, fair isle, texture, cables, etc.

And then I was introduced to the rush you get from teaching. Well, maybe not "you" you, but teachers. Not just school teachers. Anyone that passes information along to someone else in a way that helps them learn and grow. A teacher. It's incredible. And addictive.

I developed a cadence and a language to pass ideas along. I learned when to encourage and when to push. I learned more from my students than they did from me (cliché alert). But it's true. I learned how to fix more mistakes than I'd make in 10 lifetimes of knitting. And mostly I learned that I love to teach.

So when a local librarian reached out to me on Twitter and asked if I'd be interested in teaching a knitting class at her library, I jumped at the chance. We hashed out the details and tomorrow, I'm going back into the "classroom" for the first time in several years to lead a class in a beginner's hat. It's actually the best kind of project to get back into teaching or back into knitting. The mistakes that can be made are few (though I'm sure I'll be surprised) and every hat will be a success. They may not be the same size, but they'll be hats!

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Is "Free" Yarn Sufficient Payment

From left to right: Mountain Colors Twizzle (Loganberry),
Unnamed Cashmere (400 yards, 2 ounces, pink),
Spirit Trail Fiberworks (449 yard Bombyx silk lace weight, Scottish Thistle)
Yesterday I announced the beginning of test knitting for my new pattern, Edgewood Sweater. As part of the test knit, and hopefully to make up for not being able to pay actual cash money to testers, I said I'd be giving away three skeins of yarn. I hope that's not something that someone takes offense to.

I'm ultra-highly sensitive to causing offense. This often causes me to offend randomly. And that frustrates me greatly.

I know that all knitters are great stash collectors; I'm a great stash collector. So I definitely have extra yarn that, while it's beautiful and I love it--even covet it--I'm never going to use it. I actually can't think of anything better than giving it away. Giving away yarn makes me very very happy.

And if I can get something out of it, too, so much the better.

I hope that one of these three skeins will help sweeten the deal and encourage knitters to sign up to test Edgewood. Reminder, you can read more on yesterday's post, or in this thread on Ravelry.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Step Three: Test the Pattern

Sleeve
A sweater sleeve in process
Wait, what were Step One and Step Two?

If you've been following me on Instagram (and, really, why not? It's harmless and I sometimes post pictures of pretty yarn and even other snapshots like that time I bleached my hair to orange), you will have noticed that I've been working on a sweater design. I've knit sweaters before; I've even knit sweaters without patterns and just made it up as I go, taking measurements and fitting the sweater to the recipient. But this is the first time I've set out to design a sweater from start to finish with the end goal of self-publishing the pattern.

It's a big proposition. I'm always kind of amazed when I'm working on a pattern that there are designers that churn out pattern after pattern and they all seem to be amazing and beautiful. I'd love to know their trick. So far, my only trick seems to be "let's design a sweater and just throw different stitches and yarns at it and see what happens."

So now to the sweater I've been working on. It's striped, short sleeve and has a loose cowl neck that, hopefully, is flattering on a wide variety of bodies. I wanted a cowl neck that is "built in" to the sweater front and not a traditional pick-up-and-knit cowl neck collar. I've seen this type of design on a lot of t-shirts and I think it's very flattering.

For the yarn, I pulled four balls of Juniper Moon Farm Zooey DK, a linen/cotton blend that I had purchased for a different project that just never materialized. I like the three muted colors I had on hand and wanted stripes, something less traditional than just plain stripes. The way these stripes work out, there's no need to cut the yarn and it creates an interesting shadow-type effect. I think it would also be very sharp in darker colors as well, though I'd be tempted, personally, to keep the colors close in tone so the stripes aren't the main feature.

Another feature of the pattern is that the yarn is knit at a looser gauge than usual. It's a DK or light worsted yarn but I knit at a gauge of 4 stitches/inch. It has a nice gentle hand and, at the slight positive ease, skims the body lightly.

I've been working with a tech editor and she's definitely whipping me into shape, or, really, the pattern. It's a lot of number wrangling and she's a whiz. So I'm finally ready to start finding test knitters for the pattern.

In an ideal world, I'd love to line up test knitters, send them yarn and, in exchange for their expertise and work, pay them. Unfortunately, it isn't an ideal world. Yet. It's coming. So I'll be running the test knit through a group on Ravelry. I will offer any of my self-published patterns (literally, any number of them) to any test knitter that completes the knit and all that complete the test knit will also be entered in a drawing to win one of three awesome skeins of yarn. I'll go stash diving and pull 'em out -- it involves me going into a room I've been trying to avoid because it desperately needs cleaning and organizing -- but I can promise at least one will be cashmere. I don't pass along mediocre yarn.

I'm looking forward to meeting and working with new and fun knitters. Please join in below, or see the post in "The Test Pool" group on Ravelry!

Edgewood Sweater




Bust Circumference
32''
34''
36''
38''
40''
42''
44''
46''
48''
50''
52''
54''
Sweater Circumference
34''
36''
38''
40''
42''
44''
46''
48''
50''
52''
54''
56''
Color A
yards
470
470
490
530
590
640
690
730
760
810
860
890

meters
430
430
450
490
540
590
640
670
700
750
790
820
Color B
yards
140
140
150
160
180
190
210
220
230
250
260
270

meters
130
130
140
150
170
180
200
210
220
230
240
250
Color C
yards
140
140
150
160
180
190
210
220
230
250
260
270

meters
130
130
140
150
170
180
200
210
220
230
240
250


Wednesday, March 30, 2016

A Peek at a Swatch

Step one: find the last photo of knitting or yarn on your phone and post it. 


Step two: talk about it

I've been shopping with a friend on our lunch hour recently at a high-end-ish clothing store for women that focuses on two primary colors (or non-colors, depending how you look at it) and, as per usual, I focus on the knitwear. I'm very intrigued by the classy, lightweight knitwear that you often find in the stores. It contrasts so much with "traditional" heavier hand knits, especially in garments. I totally get why it's intimidating to knit an entire sweater with lightweight yarns; that's a lot of work. I wonder if I can change that a little bit. 

The search above is three strands of lace yarn, Fyberspates Scrumptious Lace, in blue/blue/grey on US 8/5mm needles. It feels really interesting, a different drape from both plied and single/strand yarns and I really want to play with this more. I'm also going to mix the pattern up with some panels of single strands of the same yarn on US 5/3.75mm needles.

Okay, your turn. Post a photo, a little bit about it, and pass it on!


Monday, February 8, 2016

Cowls In a Book; and Thank You

inside book image
cover image So I have two things to share with you and one is an excuse for the other one being so late. I have so many other excuses but this is all I'm going with for right now.

Last week, or two weeks ago, I'm not sure, I got a copy of a new book in the mail -- "60 Quick Cowls" -- and one of my patterns is in it! It's a casual cowl with cables and a simple texture named "Budding Out." And the yarn (Cascade Yarns Highland Duo), oh, it was very very nice to knit with. I stashed several more skeins for myself. It's mostly alpaca with some merino wool. It's buttery soft and I didn't have any issue with color loss when I blocked the finished cowl, which I'm always ready for when it's a red shade even though it oddly happens more often with blue shades. Huh, something to think about.

The cowl starts with a cable knit sideways, so it's a lot of knitting but very few stitches to cast on. I think that's one the things I get irritated with when I'm casting on for a project like a cowl or a hat with fine yarn or afghan or... well... anything... when I can't count and I end up casting on multiple times. Or I use the wrong amount of yarn and have to start over. (You wouldn't believe how many times I cast on for a hat and end up fudging the ribbing just so I don't have to cast on again. Besides, is 76 stitches really so different from 80?)

So you cast on a few for the cable, work a long cabled piece, then pick up stitches and work the main part of the cowl. Again, this helps eliminate another annoying thing with cowls or "in-the-round" projects. The twist. The stupid twist that even the most experienced knitter cannot avoid sometimes.

I might be a little grump today. Maybe it's because I didn't get any solid knitting done this weekend, just a lot of thinking and watching. But now that I'm thinking about it, the swatching I did is going to be amazing. It's totally a project I'd do, but I'm not sure if it's something other people would tackle. How do you feel about lace patterning on every row? Too much?

Anyway, back to last week -

Remember when I did that thing with #MakingMondays and ended up getting mentioned on the livecast? And then I knitted hats for Jordan and Heléne and William? Well they all received their hats and there was a special #MakingMondays short little cast about it. Take a look/listen:



A special thank you from #MakingMondays with Helene Yorke!
Posted by Jordan Roth on Monday, February 1, 2016


So there's a few things I've learned and I'm trying to make myself really believe. First, you can try something new and it won't kill you. I didn't die. I didn't even die of embarrassment, though I'm not sure why I would think that would happen. It's scary to put yourself out there, but all that happened was I now have a tiny connection to some people I didn't know before. If I'm ever in NYC again and walking down the street and I happen to run into Jordan or Heléne or William, I can say "Hello! We haven't formally met but we all do awesome things!" (Okay, that might still be a little weird.) But there's a connection.

Second, there's the thing Heléne says "All creators need a yes." I get it. She's totally right. It's more
than knowing you can do something. It's not creating in a vacuum. It's having other people, any other person, say "Yes, I see what you did. I appreciate the amount of work/talent/ability/dedication that was involved." They don't have to like it. They don't have to want it. Just acknowledge it. If it were for awards and accolades, nothing would be created. How many billions of hours are spent on creating things that will only be seen by one or two people. I think these things are created just for the acknowledgment. Acknowledgment from co-creators, audiences, families, critics, strangers on the street, strangers on the internet.

And this should be encouraged. Please remember this. When someone creates something for you, posts a photo of it online, talks about it, please acknowledge it. You don't have to love it. Just say thank you. "Thank you" is a powerful phrase. It doesn't have to be endorsement or approval. It's just "Thank you." But to the creator - wow - it's powerful. It's "I've seen you. I heard you."

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Snowy Weekend Knitting

Two hats in process: Fancy Tiger Crafts Heirloom Romney
on the left and Quince and Co. Chickadee on the right
Last weekend was the first time I'd been snowed in for multiple days in a row in a long time and it was wonderful. There was knitting and movies and television and reading and cooking and knitting and eating and drinking and knitting. I shoveled snow and napped. I read a little and napped. I knitted and knitted and knitted. And napped.

Two finished hats, a third hat in process, two cinnamon
rolls and adult-ified hot cocoa
The snow started Friday morning. I had already discussed with my boss that I probably would just work from home; the forecast for snow was dire. But when I woke up, the ground was bare and it was still fairly warm. For a brief second I thought I should probably just suck it up, get dressed and go to work like a responsible adult. Well, I'm so glad I got over that quickly.

By 9:00 am, the snow started. It was light flurries and then just steady. Lots and lots and lots of snow. It didn't stop snowing until Saturday afternoon! Now, being in West Virginia, if you're not aware, we're not usually accustomed to quite so much snow in the winter. We usually get a couple good snowfalls and then it warms up and melts away. But this was, like, 16" of snow! Wow.

The knitting time was awesome. Even being inside, the snowfall just makes the world seem quieter and more peaceful. Looking outside my windows and seeing the world through the filter of snow is very relaxing. I worked on my three hats for Making Mondays (see the last post) and was able to finish all of them by Sunday. I had hoped they'd be done by Friday morning so I could dash to the post office and mail them but, no, that didn't happen.

Knitting these hats was a fun exercise. The red hat is a practice/sample of a new design I'm working on that I'm calling Gilbert. (Quick history lesson: Cass Gilbert was a successful architect in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. Not only did he design West Virginia's state capitol building, he designed the Woolworth Building in New York City and the United States Supreme Court building!) The hat features a simple garter stripe texture pattern interspersed with strong cables, both reminiscent of the marble blocks and columns that are a prominent part of the facade of West Virginia's capitol building.

For the other two hats, I used two colors of the same wool: Fancy Tiger Craft's Heirloom Romney Yarn in black and teal (I'm sure they have more creative names for their colors than that). The yarn is so wooly. It's a little rough at first but it just feels so amazing and real. I can't get enough of wool yarn. For the teal hat, I used a twisted stitch pattern to make diamonds and for the black hat, I used the garter stripe texture pattern from the Gilbert hat I'm working on but without the cables.

So I mailed all hats off to their recipients and they should be receiving them any day. Unfortunately, my best intentions were forgotten when it came down to actually mailing the yarns. I meant to include care instructions and fiber information. I wanted them to know the hats were knit with all-American wool from all-American companies by an all-American dude. Did I? Nope. So I guess I'll email them and be all "well, I'm kind of a doofus but your hats are 100% wool so please don't put it in the washing machine." Or if the hat gets shrunk, let me know and I'll make another one. It's not like I'm running out of yarn.

Also, like a bad blogger/crafter, I didn't take any pictures of the finished hats except the ones posted here: folded up and still on the needles. Blah.

How would you spend three days snowed in if you had the chance? Would you be super-productive and get lots of cleaning done or would you take the time to relax and recharge and get some me-time? Let me know!

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Try Something New On a Monday

I'm not sure if anyone is following me on the random social media places but on Twitter/Periscope (I think Twitter owns Periscope), you may have seen that I had some interesting interactions with strangers Monday night about 9:30 pm EST. It all started, for me, when I got a wild idea and decided to stop being afraid of possibilities and just do something bizarre. For me. Bizarre for more.

First, this post on my Tumblr, which is usually just me posting pictures of awesome knitwear I find online or pictures of what I'm currently knitting:

http://rodeoknits.tumblr.com/post/137585444725/trying-something-newdaringscary-so-im-totally
So I was watching the Periscope broadcast, just enjoying a giant cookie that I baked (it was just some yummy tub-o'-Nestlé-Toll-House cookie dough that I mashed into one big cookie) and some adult hot cocoa (maybe more Bailey's than hot cocoa), when the host of Making Mondays, Jordan Roth, started to mention my Tumblr post. I literally just stopped. I don't think I took a breath for several minutes. Holy crap it was scary. Let's be honest. It's a totally weird thing to put out there. "Hi, I'm some odd stranger dude that knits and I want to knit a hat for three people I've never met." Weird.

But then there was this look of what I think is excitement about a hat from guest Heléne Yorke and I plotzed (that may not be the right word but the sound of it accurately describes how I felt).

Heléne and Jordan
Sorry for the crazy quality; it's the best screen cap I could grab

So I offered to knit three hats and, bam, almost as soon as Jordan said "Go do this thing. Tweet at RodeoKnits and tell him what color hat you want" I got a few messages on Twitter. It was so cool! I mean, connections! With people!

So that's how it comes to be that I'm knitting a red hat for a guy from New Jersey (or at least that's what a little Twitter-stalking as turned up - hello, William!) and for Jordan Roth and for an honest-to-goodness celebrity, Heléne. An actress. Like for real. Check her out! So I've got to think up another design for two hats.
William's hat in progress. The dangle-y bit is
just to keep me organized and on track and you can
get your own from LimaPopShoppe!

I hope these people don't mind that they'll be getting prototypes of new designs I plan to release in the next few weeks! William, your hat in process is pictured to the right (and yes, I did start it last night after you requested a red hat). I think Jordan and Heléne's will be matching hats but in different colors. I have the same yarn in both black and turquoise/teal. They can fight it out.

What will come of this? Who knows. Maybe nothing. But that's okay. I tried something new, something else happened and I DIDN'T DIE! I guess that means I should try other new things and it won't kill me.

Bonus: I just found the video on Facebook Live and you can see the part where I get mentioned about one hour, eight minutes in. Facebook doesn't make it easy to get to the part of the video where you can find me.

Come create plays & dance & food & fun! The 1st #MakingMondays on #FacebookLive! Leave your comments to collaborate with us!

Posted by Jordan Roth on Monday, January 18, 2016

18 Days In and 2016 Is Already a Big Year

I'm calling it now. 2016 is the Year of Steven. Any Steven. If your name is Steven, you're golden. (I might be tempted to allow "Stephen", too, but c'mon, you already get a "ph" so get your own year.)

I started 2016 in Las Vegas. I know. Crazy. It's not really the kind of city you think of when you think of me (if you think of me). I'm much more quiet beachside town, maybe on the coast of Maine or England. Actually, quiet beachside town in Maine is one of my goals. That's another story.


Las Vegas is big and bright and overwhelming and lots of brown and tan and .... I'm stopping there. If you give me a glass of wine or a beer, I'll definitely go into what I think of Las Vegas. But there was one major awesome thing in Las Vegas: Sin City Knit Shop. Oh man, that place is awesome. The owner, Debbi, was so welcoming and friendly. And excited to have a "designer" in her shop. (I use quotation marks because that's something I'm working on this year: seeing myself as a real designer.)

I picked up some great yarns there, but of course, no pictures. It's in a bag somewhere in my apartment. I'm such a bad knitter that I buy yarn I love and then stash it away and forget about it. Debbie surprised me on our 3rd trip (yes, we went to the yarn store three times at least, maybe more) with a request to design something for her store for a project they're putting together. I came home with some really amazing yarn from Downtown DyeWorks, a Las Vegas local dyer. It's dark and mysterious with a little sparkle of gold. Very different from what I usually knit with but, hey, you do you, Steven.

I received a very exciting email while I was sitting at a coffee shop in Las Vegas in response to a contest I entered. Hopefully I'll be able to give you even more exciting news about it shortly. I used a new product and designed a project and I'm one of 10 finalists for the grand prize. It was a really interesting design challenge and I enjoyed the process. I'll post about it when I hear the final results (even if I'm not the winner!).

Since 2016 is still so young, I feel like I still have time to set goals for the year. (You're welcome to give me a swift kick in the butt if I still feel like that in May.) I do have some things I'd like to try, though, some superficial goals:
  • I want to submit more designs to third-party publishers -- magazines, books, yarn companies, etc. I have to start believing in myself more and just rip that band aid off. The answer will always be no if I don't ask the question. 
  • I want to take my design life more seriously as a job. I want to set up my home studio to be more conducive to being productive and working. I already cancelled cable television so there really is no excuse to not use my office. (The old excuse being "I can't watch television in there.") I can watch YouTube and Netflix anywhere.
  • I want to meet new people and make new connections. I want this to be in person or online. I want to use Twitter and Facebook and Tumblr and Ello (you should try it, it's awesome) to make new friends and collaborate with people.
  • I want to do something to give back, or pay it forward, or something like that. Charity. I'm not sure if this is a big project I put together to collect knitwear or money or what. I'm still thinking about it.
That's it. Four things. I think that's a good basic broad list of ideas. Now I should sit down and make actual goals.

I'll do that tomorrow. Right now, I want to keep knitting this new hat.